LIFE IS A JOURNEY, ARE YOU READY?

ON WEDDINGS : WHAT IS THE DEAL WITH A WHITE WEDDING GOWN?

This is our research:

Even though colors and styles have changed throughout the years, brides have always dressed for the occasion. Of course royalty and those with a high social standing always dressed at the height of fashion, sparing no expense. Those who had limited means still treated a wedding as a special occasion and dressed as formal as their budgets would allow.

Ancient brides chose to symbolize their happiness by wearing bright colored wedding garments. During Medieval times, the wedding was more than just a union between two people, in many occasions it was a union between two families, two businesses and even two countries. Weddings were more a matter of politics than love. Brides had to dress in a manner which cast her family in the most favorable light, for she wasn’t only representing herself.

Medieval brides of an elevated social standing wore rich colors and expensive fabrics. It was common to see well-to-do brides wearing boldly colored layers of furs, velvet and silk. Those of a lower social standing wore fabrics that weren’t as rich, though they copied the elegant styles as best they could.

WHEN DID THE WHITE COME IN?
Many wedding dresses were initially black because that was often a woman's most formal gown. Rather than have a special dress for one event, she would wear her best dress for her wedding and it would be reworn for many other occasions, including church, funerals, and other weddings. 

In 1840, Queen Victoria married Prince Albert of Saxe wearing a white wedding gown. In those days white was not a symbol of purity, blue was. In fact, many women chose the color blue for their wedding dresses for specifically that reason. White, on the other hand, symbolized wealth.

Since white wasn’t generally chosen as the color in which to be married, Victoria’s dress came as quite the surprise. It wasn’t an unpleasant surprise, however, because soon after Women all over Europe and America began wearing white wedding dresses as well. There were still those who chose to get married in other colors, but it was the trend among those of an elevated social status to wear a glamorous white dress.

By the turn of the century, white was the color of choice. These dresses followed the trends and style of their day and continue to do so a century later. In fact, it’s very rare for a bride in Europe or the United States to get married in a color other than white.

It was a different story during the depression when women were married in their Sunday best. During World War II, many brides felt it was inappropriate to get married in a lavish white dress, and chose church dresses or a good suit for their wedding attire.

After the war, a prosperous era dawned and wedding dresses reflected this. Formal white wedding gowns became the fashion. Shades of white, such as cream, off white or ivory are all acceptable wedding dress colors, while bright colors such as blue, green or pink are frowned upon. It’s considered bad luck to get married in a black dress.

Today’s bride can get married in almost any style. From an ornate designer dress to a more informal beach wedding dress it’s a given she’ll look beautiful in whatever style she chooses.

We are totally considering blue, green or pink.

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