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HOW TO PROOF YEAST WITHOUT A THERMOMETER : DID WE DO IT RIGHT?

We are yeast-proofing idiots. We also do not have a thermometer. So, it is tough luck. In order to rise yeast, we would need about 100F of water, which is 38C. How can we ever measure that? Some people suggested the temperature should be the same as a baby's milk bottle. Urgh, we never had a baby.

So this is what we did. We needed a cup of warm water. We mixed half a cup of freshly boiled water with half a cup of cold tap water. Let it sit for a few minutes and started the proofing process.

It started frothing, seemed right.

There were little bubbles coming out of the mixture. Perhaps the temperature was OK.

We tried another mixture at the same time but it did nothing. The one in the bowl was from a packet yeast and the one in the glass was from a box of yeast. We already suspected there could be something wrong with the boxed yeast, that wasn't active anymore. We think we are right.

Nothing really happened.

There was only this much frothing in the end. Not enough.

The packet yeast did well. Off we go to make that focaccia now.

2 comments:

CS said...

Oh gosh! no babies?... yet... so when huh? lolx

aiyah temperature of baby milk also meant it's warm enough to the touch. usually mothers will test this by dropping a few drop of milk from the bottle on to the inner side of her wrist; you know the side where people slash when they are way too tired : ( ... anyway, i think the inner wrist is more sensitive.

some bread making books suggest dipping your finger into the warm water. it should be warm enough for you to stick your finger in and let it stay there comfortably for you to feel the warm. a teaspoon of sugar is sometime added too cos sugar is yeast food. : )

suzene said...

The yeast thingy... sigh. I have a container of yeast we brought from Mustafa. It doesn't seem to rise as much as the packet yeast we bought in Europe. I think the focaccia recipe needs some tweaking. Either that or we are not too experienced with yeast yet. Once, we left the dough to rest for a few hours instead of the 20minutes the focaccia recipe suggested, and it kind of doubled in size although the Mustafa yeast didn't rise as much in the fermenting process. We are baffled.

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